Hi, i started playing the acoustic guitar back in may 2014 and had no previous experience with instruments before then. i started just so i could play songs i like (which i have achieved haha) but one of the first things i started doing was making up my own songs/instrumentals, most of the songs i have made up are in fingerstyle because i find fingerstyle more fun and challenging to play at times (most of these songs a reletively simple). I’ve managed to make progress and i love playing guitar, it’s become something i have to do everyday, i don’t always practice everyday but i always play for at least 30mins. I still have trouble with some simple things like barre chords (I actually have a lot of trouble with those haha) and i can only play mostly simple chords like Em, D, A, G, C, em7 and am7. i can’t read or write music/tabs but it’s something that i really want to be able to do and i’m willing to put the time and effort in to get better and improve because guitar is slowly becoming less of a hobbie and more of a passion. I want to be able to write and play music like eric clapton or ed sheeran, not to be a performer or fame like some other people my age i know want (I am 16). I’d just like to know where i should start and what direction i should go to learn how to read tabs and any other ways to read/write music for guitar, i’d also like to get better at barre coulds and just learning other chords in general, i’d still consider myself very much an amteur but i want to improve and i like a challenge when it comes to guitar.
If you are an intermediate player, chances are you've learned by picking things up here and there on your own. You may have taken a few lessons. You may have read a few books or watched a few videos. You may or may not have learned to read music. You've enjoyed being able to play the basics, but now you're ready to move beyond that. You know that you want to begin getting serious about your guitar training, but you're not sure how. Gibson's Learn & Master Guitar is your answer.
Free stuff: You Tube, UltimateGuitar.com (or just about any guitar apps online). Guitar forums… maybe check out Reddit /r/guitar or /r/guitarlessons. Also… Stay tuned, I may be setting up a more interactive component to my website just for this kind of thing… As always.. keep me posted on your progress and let me know if you have any other questions!
My scenario: I’m an almost-fifty-year-old and I’ve flirted with learning to play guitar since I was a teenager. I just never connected with it – I don’t know if I was too young, had goals that were too lofty, wasn’t serious enough about it, or was just too impatient. (Probably some combo of all of these each time I tried.) But a month and a half ago I resolved to make it happen.
It's something you can achieve. If you follow the rules of thumb laid out in this article, you'll be jamming in no time. These tricks and trips won't turn you into the second coming of Eddie van Halen, but it will transform you into someone that can whip out a guitar and immediately play thousands of the world’s most recognizable and popular songs on your first try.
I am 21 year old and don’t even have a single piece of knowledge in music whether it is vocals or instruments. Now, I desperately want to learn guitar. I can spend 1 hour in practicing. Suppose, if I want to join a rock band in next 2 years, will it be possible for me? How much time will it take for me to compose my own tunes on guitar? As I have zero knowledge in music, should I learn from online lessons or is it better for me to go to a tutor?
“One additional comment about the ease of learning guitar. Since guitar music is often written in “Tabulature Notation” or “TAB” it is much-much easier to ready than standard music notation. TAB identifies the exact fret to press and string to pluck to produce a specific note. And TAB also identifies exactly which frets to press and strings to strum to create a specific chord. taab notation is very easy to learn and very easy to read. Our students usually gain a full understanding in during their first lesson.”

I’m really interested in learning a guitar (acoustic/classical), and I do have some music background (Erhu diploma, piano grade 6 and theory grade 5 (which I forgot everything))- I’m planning on getting a guitar after my end of year exams, and am planning to dedicate my time to practice the guitar (fingerstyle) everyday. I’ve practiced erhu 9 hours a day before but I think I’ll just do 2-3 hours on guitar a day? My goal is to play the song Sunflower by paddy sun, how long do you reckon it will take? Should I get a teacher to catalyze my progress or can I learn by myself? How long will it take for both to play the song Sunflower masterfully?

If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
This time around, I’m loving it – I feel engaged with the instrument instead of daunted or mocked by it, and I’m finding the music theory fascinating. I can’t wait to learn more about both the instrument and the theory behind the music I (sort of) play with it. (Not too mention wanting to learn as much as I can about the physical components of playing – my guitars and amps.) Each day, I look forward to the time I have to pick up my guitar.
Practicing on your own is a great way to get to the nitty-gritty parts of a piece or song. When you have to repeat two bars of music over and over again until you feel like you’ve played it a thousand times, it’s best to do so on your own so you don’t drive the other people around you crazy. Intense, solitary practice can also help you get better at playing without looking. But when you have a piece performance-ready (which means you can play the piece through without having to repeatedly stop to fix mistakes), it’s best to practice in front of an audience.

Decide if you want an acoustic or an electric guitar. Some people say that because acoustics are larger, have thicker strings, and are generally more difficult to play, beginners should start with acoustic guitars to build up their finger strength and agility. Others say that beginners should buy electric guitars because they’re thinner and easier to play. All you should worry about is the sound you want to produce with your guitar.


Hey Drew – if you practice for 45 minutes everyday, you will make progress really really quickly (just make sure when you practice that you continue to push yourself to play more difficult things, either more complicated or more quickly… don’t just play the same things over and over again (at the same speed, or you’ll never get better). Upgrade whenever you want – and whenever you have the money to spend. I’ve been playing the guitar for 20 years and I still use one of the first guitars I ever had (just a $200 basic fender acoustic). Hope that helps!
Though this decision can be based on preference, we think the best guitar for a beginner is the acoustic guitar. Classical guitars have a wider neck, which can be hard for younger students or physically smaller individuals to handle when learning guitar chords. Meanwhile, the electric guitar is designed to be played with an amplifier, which comes at an additional cost. Acoustic guitars are simple and require little to no additional equipment, making them ideal for beginner guitarists.

I am 21 year old and don’t even have a single piece of knowledge in music whether it is vocals or instruments. Now, I desperately want to learn guitar. I can spend 1 hour in practicing. Suppose, if I want to join a rock band in next 2 years, will it be possible for me? How much time will it take for me to compose my own tunes on guitar? As I have zero knowledge in music, should I learn from online lessons or is it better for me to go to a tutor?
Yes. You should learn acoustic or electric guitar first. On the other hand, you could learn both acoustic and electric guitar at the same time. The fundamentals of guitar playing are exactly the same on both: tuning, how to hold or support the guitar (except the Flying-V electric), hand positions, fretting, how to play individual notes, chords, scales, basic strumming, and even fingerstyle playing.
Chances are, the reason you’re learning guitar is because your were inspired by a musician or style of music. Well, when you get to the point where you have some chords under your belt, and you’re ready to cover some songs, stick with the music that made you want to begin playing in the first place. For me, that was Blues Traveler. I learned a bunch of Blues Traveler songs on piano and guitar. I was really digging learning all the music I loved and, at the same time, was expanding my personal chord library like crazy!
Obvious but true.  For anyone who knows me I’m all about efficiency – and making the most of my time.  I’m a strong proponent of deliberate practice. This is how elite musicians become elite musicians.  But it’s also how beginners (or anyone) can learn more quickly – without spending a lot of time.  Essentially it boils down to practicing the right material.  As I said, I’m big on efficiency.
I started guitar at 16 but i was very lazy and didnt practice a lot.I turned a month ago 17 and started to play guitar seriously for a month now,im frustrated because i wasted a year and i feel myself old but my friends and parents always says 17 is an awesome age to start learning on instruments and there isn’t much difference beetwen 16 and 17..is 17 really good age to learn any instrument.I can play all the C chords,6 type of D chords and changing beetwen them…i started to learn Square Hammer’s intro.

It doesn’t matter how you specifically grip the pick; you can adjust that to your comfort level, just as long as its wedged between your two digits. Feel free to experiment with different grips until you find what works best for you.  You'll automatically course-correct as your hands reposition the slipping pick until finally your brain realizes what works the best.
I’m really interested in learning a guitar (acoustic/classical), and I do have some music background (Erhu diploma, piano grade 6 and theory grade 5 (which I forgot everything))- I’m planning on getting a guitar after my end of year exams, and am planning to dedicate my time to practice the guitar (fingerstyle) everyday. I’ve practiced erhu 9 hours a day before but I think I’ll just do 2-3 hours on guitar a day? My goal is to play the song Sunflower by paddy sun, how long do you reckon it will take? Should I get a teacher to catalyze my progress or can I learn by myself? How long will it take for both to play the song Sunflower masterfully?
Hey Drew – if you practice for 45 minutes everyday, you will make progress really really quickly (just make sure when you practice that you continue to push yourself to play more difficult things, either more complicated or more quickly… don’t just play the same things over and over again (at the same speed, or you’ll never get better). Upgrade whenever you want – and whenever you have the money to spend. I’ve been playing the guitar for 20 years and I still use one of the first guitars I ever had (just a $200 basic fender acoustic). Hope that helps!
I have been taking lessons for 2 years, and practice at least 1 hour every day. I cannot play any songs, and can only play the last 3 or 4 lesson “riffs” from the 1st and 2nd lesson books (still on 2nd). I can mess around with 3 to 5 chords / bar chords, and sound like I might know how to play. Thats it. My teacher says that I am doing better than average. Am I being taken for a ride? I can do 4 or 5 scales up and down the neck, but have no idea what each note actually is.
I just started (1 week ago) teaching myself to play on an old classical acoustic guitar that was given to me. Eventually want to learn to play some old and new rock/pop songs so is learning on a classical guitar ok? I’m just doing basic dexterity/scales practice for about 20-45 mins a day and started learning a few chords. I do have some issues due to having smaller hands/fat fingers and was wondering if that will always hold me back or will it just take longer to get the needed dexterity? Also, calluses are coming along nicely so it’s not as painful now! 🙂
Buy the necessary accessories. If you want to play while standing, you’ll need a guitar strap to hang the guitar from your neck and shoulders. You probably also want to buy some guitar picks, which are very inexpensive. Both of these items can be found in any music store, or online. If an employee at a music store tries to sell you additional accessories (like capos, tuners, etc.), politely decline; you can purchase those later when you know your way around a guitar better, but for now, this is all you need.
Goal setting is important. There are people with over twenty years worth of experience who can play only chords, while others start shredding after only two years of playing. If you're in it for the long haul, make sure you practice for at least 2-3 hours every day. Personally, I stopped practising after I learnt the basic techniques central to metal playing, and I never learnt music theory. You should think about the style you want to play after learning the basics, because it will greatly influence how you practice.
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Learn how to read guitar tabs. Guitarists have their own system of music notation called guitar tablature, or guitar tabs for short. The basic idea is to look at each line in the "staff" of the tab in the same way you look at your guitar. Each line corresponds to a string, and each number tells you which fret to hold down when plucking that string. For example, to play this tab-notated lick from the Lynyrd Skynyrd song "Sweet Home Alabama," you would play two notes on the open D string, the B string at the third fret, the G string at the second fret, etc.
The guitar is a remarkably hackable instrument for a million reasons that will be revealed to you as you spend more time with it. As you go along in your journey you’ll find a million shortcuts and fun ways to learn fast. I’ve rarely heard any of this stuff from guitar teaches, so beware, trust your instincts, and learn from people who can show you where you want to be.
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