Success! You’ve decided to make your living doing something you love! You’ve learned so much and come so far, but there are so many styles and variations that you could likely go on finding new and different ways to play guitar forever. Taking the time for a lesson every so often can refresh your playing immensely. New skills lead to new and better songwriting, and more impressive performances, so try to meet with an instructor every month or two.
An Analogy ... I once heard of a scientific study to determine the healthiest breakfast cereal, this involved mice, which mice eating which cereal would determine the healthiest. Lucky Charms won (pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, and green clovers, "They're magically delicious!"); the "Lucky" mice didn't live the longest because it was the healthiest though ... those mice just liked it better and ate more, got more calories and nutrients over all.
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.

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Hey Timmy – exactly one month. Just kidding. The bass line to longview should be pretty basic, and you should be able to get it down in no time. Both of those songs are pretty standard power chords – which can be kind of tricky to get the hang of, but not really difficult. The tough part (for a beginner) would probably be getting these songs down on the acoustic guitar. That’s not to say you can’t do it… it just may take a little longer (and sound a little different) when compared to learning them on the electric. An hour a day of practice is a good amount of time… but don’t burn yourself out. Good luck! Let me know how it’s coming!

I’ve just bought my first guitar! I have a daughter and so from 7pm until 12pm I’m alone and going a little stir crazy! I’ve always wanted to learn the guitar but kept convincing myself I’m too old (at 27) so assuming I practice every night for around an hour, increasing it the more I enjoy it, how long do you think it would take to be able to play along to my favourite songs? I’m not trying to be a rock star haha I’d just love to be able to create the music I enjoy so much
Electric guitar: Well the world of electric guitars is in some ways more complex, as there are all kinds of different looks and technologies. And it’s not good enough to just have a guitar, you need to buy an amplifier as well. I will just recommend mid-level stuff that’s worked for me based on my preferences, but if you like “stuff” and collecting gear, you’ll find playing the guitar to be a deeply satisfying hobby :)
Hunter – You need to talk to your teacher and tell them what you want to learn. It sounds like you’re not getting what you want out of your guitar lessons. During your next lesson tell your teacher EXACTLY what you want to learn – be specific. Bring a song you’d like to play and have them help you learn it. If they won’t do that… get a new teacher.
I am 19 years old and have been singing since i was young. I have always dreamed of playing a guitar but never had the confidence to even try because of my fear of failing….i just got my first guiter and know about two chords lol i think i am going to start takeing lessons soon but i am scared that my rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia will prevent me from being able to play but i want to learn so bad but it would be nice to know if there is even a chance for me i would practice 20/30 mins 4/5 times a week if i find more free time then it would be more often but two full time jobs takes up most of my time

When I first started playing guitar, I was ready for an overnight miracle. I had my guitar, I had my amp, I had my gung-ho attitude. Why shouldn’t I be instantly amazing? Oh yeah, because it’s a skill learned over time, just like anything else. Around this time in my guitar playing infancy, I was given some great advice: Rather than rushing through training, it’s better to slow down, take your time, learn the fundamentals, and only move on when you’re ready.
Electric guitar, especially with distortion, but even with a clean sound does smooth out your ADSR envelope when you play (Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release), this does lead to sloppiness in articulation and hides variances of attack while both picking or playing legato, hammering-on, pulling-off, and tapping most especially, the primary problem with practicing this only on electric, especially with distortion, is that you end up using too much gain for your distortion setting in an effort to smooth out bad technique, it leads to a thin, buzzy, wimpy distortion tone. Practicing on an acoustic takes this crutch away and you will learn to create better tone and control on your electric from practicing on your acoustic. The problem is that if you end up never practicing your acoustic because it doesn't excite you, you'll never end up playing electric either.
Hey Chandler – I’d suggest starting with an electric bass (if that’s what you ultimately want to play). As far as left handed bassses go… I’d advise against it and learn how to play a right handed bass. Somewhere on this webpage I answered someone’s question about left vs right handed guitars… here’s my response to them (I think it applies to you as well):
First, being able to learn directly from amazing artists like Paul Gilbert is incredible. He's a great teacher and has a way of explaining things that are easy to understand and replicate. The video format is also extraordinarily helpful; I've used other sites that use only written materials (usually .pdf format), and they are difficult to navigate. The feedback, though, is what really makes this website head and shoulders above the others (even the other video websites). When I record myself and send it in, I get a response from Paul that critiques in an incredibly constructive way as well as additional exercises to work at really honing that skill. In addition, getting to see what tips he gave to other users is awesome! If you want to learn an instrument, there's no better way.
Next came some basic chords, strumming and picking. I began to work with Yousician, an app that lets you play along with animation. It picks up the music you play through your phone's microphone, and indicates whether you're hitting the correct notes, chords and timing. The instant feedback was fantastic, but it was difficult pausing the app when I needed to rewind and see something again, all while trying to hold down the chord and keep strumming.
That makes sense in some ways. Simplicity and the ease of learning the basics are some great reasons to consider an acoustic instrument as your first guitar. However, you don’t want to derail your enthusiasm and force yourself into something you aren’t going to enjoy. That’s a surefire way to end up quitting the instrument, and that, I guarantee, you will regret one day.
I picked up the guitar, along with Joseph Alexander's Beginner's Guess Lessons, a couple of months ago. Having taken a long hiatus from playing, except for a few failed and frustrating attempts to rush into all the material I knew ten or more years ago, I was thrilled with the author's teaching style and the quick progress I made. The First 100 Chords for Guitar is a fine extension for continuing my practice.
Once you have the guitar take some lessons (or have your grandfather give you some if he's available and able to - playing and teaching are very different skills though) and find some like minded friends to play with. Locally a lot of the teen-oriented lessons also help the students form bands. If your friends aren't already interested in playing there may be something similar near you.
… But really, if you want to become a professional musician, you should try to think about what that actually means (are you looking to be in a band that tours, a studio musician, to license your music for tv/radio/film, play in an orchestra, or just be a rock star)? It all really depends on your goals – and honestly, I think your ability to take advantage of opportunities to connect with other people in the profession will probably be MORE important than your proficiency.
That's it.  Our Fool's Gold Method has all you need to immediately jump out of the beginner's bracket.  The two resources above can take you the rest of the way.  When you're ready to get a better guitar, check our guide the best acoustic guitars for all budgets.  Eventually you may consider personal guitar lessons with a teacher, even if for just 6 months or so.  This way you can have your technique observed and adjusted and then be sent back on your merry way.

Most new guitar players haven’t chosen their musical direct yet. It takes some time to figure out what you really love, and what you’re really good at. An electric instrument gives you the freedom to explore those choices. You may find you love strumming chords or playing classical music finger-style and you’ll eventually switch to acoustic guitar. You may decide you love jazz, or metal or country music. You can play all of that on an electric guitar while you sort everything out.


Position your fingers on the neck. The dots on the chords represent where you should hold down your fingers on the neck. For instance, an A major is played by holding down the string on the second fret on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th string. An E minor is played by holding down the second fret on the 5th and 4th string. Hold the strings down until they are pressed against the neck of your guitar.[6]

Hi! Thanks for the article, its really encouraging having ones like this around. Okay, so I’m 16 near enough 17 and I’ve only just started practising about a week ago. So far I’ve practised around 3-4 hours a day and I aim to carry this on, maybe most certainly even more at the weekends. Guitar is something I’ve became mega passionate about and it’s really therapeutic through tough times at home. So I’ve been playing alot as I said. I really enjoy it! Like alot! Its really put a postive in my life right now and it’s changed me even though its only been a week! I’ve started off with acoustic, like everyone else, but I know my real passion is for electric but I don’t want to get one to soon. How long do you reckon it will take for me to gain an average understanding, enough to play electric? Fyi, I dont attend guitar lessons but my friend who does is lending a few tips? 95% of most of my knowledge is off youtube lessons and watching my idols perform though so I’m not sure how far I could go by doing that. But with my age I really feel as if I’ve waited to long to learn? My aim is to eventually be in a band and perform live. I love the energy and buzz of the idea of doing that. How long do you reckon it would take me to reach that point like I said before? Thank you so much for this article and I’m looking forward to a reply maybe! 🙂
Practicing on your own is a great way to get to the nitty-gritty parts of a piece or song. When you have to repeat two bars of music over and over again until you feel like you’ve played it a thousand times, it’s best to do so on your own so you don’t drive the other people around you crazy. Intense, solitary practice can also help you get better at playing without looking. But when you have a piece performance-ready (which means you can play the piece through without having to repeatedly stop to fix mistakes), it’s best to practice in front of an audience.

First, being able to learn directly from amazing artists like Paul Gilbert is incredible. He's a great teacher and has a way of explaining things that are easy to understand and replicate. The video format is also extraordinarily helpful; I've used other sites that use only written materials (usually .pdf format), and they are difficult to navigate. The feedback, though, is what really makes this website head and shoulders above the others (even the other video websites). When I record myself and send it in, I get a response from Paul that critiques in an incredibly constructive way as well as additional exercises to work at really honing that skill. In addition, getting to see what tips he gave to other users is awesome! If you want to learn an instrument, there's no better way.
The guitar is a physical activity And like any physical activity, your body (muscles, bones, tendons, skin) need time to develop and adapt. Your fingers aren’t used to moving in these new ways, so give them a break, but keep working at it. Usually the more your practice (as long as you’re practicing correctly and pushing yourself) the quicker you will adapt and be able to move on.
Here’s a fact: Your fingers will hurt for a while when you first start playing. This happens for several reasons. One reason is, beginners tend to press down too hard on the strings. Another reason is the guitar’s action might be too high (action = the distance from the strings to the fret board). But, the main reason for calluses is that it’s a rite of passage, it just happens, it means you’re a guitar player. Welcome to the club! Too many beginner guitar players stop playing because their fingers hurt. But don’t quit! The pain goes away once your fingers callus. Just keep strumming away and you’ll be glad you stuck with it.
Until recently, I’ve approached a very experienced guitarist at a bar to sing with me, he had been doing it for 20 over years. Not only had he told me I’m not that good in singing (which he’s the only one so far), when I told him I would love to learn to play guitar, he discouraged me by saying “guitar isn’t that easy to learn, and you don’t have any music experience”. That was real hurtful, but after reading your article, I feel motivated again, with enough practice, just one hour each day, I’ll see where I can get to in 6 months.
These are essential elements that you’ll need to wrap your head around if you want to play on a consistent basis. However, I realize that when taken as one collective group, it can look as overwhelming as picking up your guitar without any prior knowledge, if not more so. Because of this, let’s not worry about this info for now. Bookmark the articles, and return to them later – they’re not going anywhere.
Electric guitar, especially with distortion, but even with a clean sound does smooth out your ADSR envelope when you play (Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release), this does lead to sloppiness in articulation and hides variances of attack while both picking or playing legato, hammering-on, pulling-off, and tapping most especially, the primary problem with practicing this only on electric, especially with distortion, is that you end up using too much gain for your distortion setting in an effort to smooth out bad technique, it leads to a thin, buzzy, wimpy distortion tone. Practicing on an acoustic takes this crutch away and you will learn to create better tone and control on your electric from practicing on your acoustic. The problem is that if you end up never practicing your acoustic because it doesn't excite you, you'll never end up playing electric either.
I am trying to learn to play the harmonica in what spare time I can afford. The basics orf the lessons are quite solid. Without these lessons I would achieve a static level - this allows continual slow improvement related to the time I have to invest. They say it takes 10,000 hrous to master anything, at 300 hours a year that will take me some number of years, but its a labor of love with solid guidance by an expert.
Download apps that will help you learn how to play. There are apps that you can download to your mobile device that will help you learn how to play the acoustic guitar. These apps range from step-to-step guides on how to play, to apps that can act as mixers and recorders. Go to the app store for your device and try to find some apps that can help you.

Now that you’ve learned how to purchase a guitar, how to play guitar chords, and the basics of playing a guitar, you’ll just need to maintain practice! Use the ChordBuddy device as long as you need to, removing tabs as you progress. You’ll be ready to perform for your family and friends in no time at all. When you see how easy it is to finally practice and play the guitar, you’re not going to want to give up! See how ChordBuddy works, and discover how beginners, teachers, senior citizens, people with arthritis, and those with disabilities can play the guitar. To contact us, click here or call 877-947-2641.
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